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Motor-visual neurons and action recognition in social interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2014

Stephan de la Rosa
Affiliation:
Department of Perception for Biological Cybernetics, Cognition, and Action, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. delarosa@tuebingen.mpg.de http://www.kyb.mpg.de/~delarosa heinrich.buelthoff@tuebingen.mpg.de http://www.kyb.mpg.de/~hhb
Heinrich H. Bülthoff
Affiliation:
Department of Perception for Biological Cybernetics, Cognition, and Action, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. delarosa@tuebingen.mpg.de http://www.kyb.mpg.de/~delarosa heinrich.buelthoff@tuebingen.mpg.de http://www.kyb.mpg.de/~hhb Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, Korea

Abstract

Cook et al. suggest that motor-visual neurons originate from associative learning. This suggestion has interesting implications for the processing of socially relevant visual information in social interactions. Here, we discuss two aspects of the associative learning account that seem to have particular relevance for visual recognition of social information in social interactions – namely, context-specific and contingency based learning.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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