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Moving fast and seeing slow? The visual consequences of vigorous movement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2021

Martin Rolfs
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin10099, Germanymartin.rolfs@hu-berlin.de; sven.ohl@hu-berlin.de; http://www.rolfslab.de Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Berlin, Berlin10115, Germany
Sven Ohl
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin10099, Germanymartin.rolfs@hu-berlin.de; sven.ohl@hu-berlin.de; http://www.rolfslab.de

Abstract

In active agents, sensory and motor processes form an inevitable bond. This wedding is particularly striking for saccadic eye movements – the prime target of Shadmehr and Ahmed's thesis – which impose frequent changes on the retinal image. Changes in movement vigor (latency and speed), therefore, will need to be accompanied by changes in visual and attentional processes. We argue that the mechanisms that control movement vigor may also enable vision to attune to changes in movement kinematics.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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