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On the constructive episodic simulation of past and future events

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2007

Daniel L. Schacter
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. dls@wjh.harvard.eduhttp://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~dswebdaddis@wjh.harvard.eduhttp://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~daddis
Donna Rose Addis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. dls@wjh.harvard.eduhttp://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~dswebdaddis@wjh.harvard.eduhttp://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~daddis

Abstract

We consider the relation between past and future events from the perspective of the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis, which holds that episodic simulation of future events requires a memory system that allows the flexible recombination of details from past events into novel scenarios. We discuss recent neuroimaging and behavioral evidence that support this hypothesis in relation to the theater production metaphor.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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