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Perceptual fluency and lexical access for function versus content words

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2004

Sidney J. Segalowitz*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1, Canadahttp://www.psyc.brocku.ca/people/segalowitz.htm
Korri Lane*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1, Canadahttp://www.psyc.brocku.ca/people/segalowitz.htm

Abstract

By examining single-word reading times (in full sentences read for meaning), we show that (1) function words are accessed faster than content words, independent of perceptual characteristics; (2) previous failures to show this involved problems of frequency range and task used; and (3) these differences in lexical access are related to perceptual fluency. We relate these findings to issues in the literature on event-related potentials (ERPs) and neurolinguistics.

Type
Continuing Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

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References

Commentary on Friedemann Pulvermüller (1999). Words in the brain's language. BBS 22(2)253–336.