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Replicators, lineages, and interactors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2014

Daniel J. Taylor
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK. djt20@bath.ac.ukjjb@cs.bath.ac.ukhttp://www.cs.bath.ac.uk/~jjb
Joanna J. Bryson
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK. djt20@bath.ac.ukjjb@cs.bath.ac.ukhttp://www.cs.bath.ac.uk/~jjb

Abstract

The target article argues that whole groups can act as interactors in an evolutionary process. We believe that Smaldino's discussion would be advanced by a more thorough analysis of the appropriate replicators and lineages for this model. We show that cultural evolution is necessarily a separate process from cultural group selection, and we also illustrate that the two processes may influence each other as demonstrated by an agent-based model of communicating food-processing skills.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

Čače, I. & Bryson, J. J. (2007) Agent based modelling of communication costs: Why information can be free. In: Emergence and evolution of linguistic communication, ed. Lyon, C., Nehaniv, C. L. & Cangelosi, A., pp. 305–22. Springer.Google Scholar
Hamilton, W. D. (1964) The genetical evolution of social behaviour. Journal of Theoretical Biology 7:152.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sober, E. & Wilson, D. S. (1998) Unto others: The evolution and psychology of unselfish behavior. Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
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