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The social motivation for social learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2008

Mark Nielsen
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia. nielsen@psy.uq.edu.auhttp://www.psy.uq.edu.au/people/personal.html?id=636

Abstract

Through the second year, children's copying behaviour shifts from a focus on emulating to a focus on imitating. This shift can be explained by a change in focus from copying others to satisfy cognitive motivations to copying in order to satisfy social motivations. As elegant and detailed as the shared circuits model (SCM) is, it misses this crucial, motivation-based feature of imitation.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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References

Dijksterhuis, A. (2005) Why we are social animals: The high road to imitation as social glue. In: Perspectives on imitation: From neuroscience to social science, vol. 2: Imitation, human development, and culture, ed. Hurley, S. & Chater, N., pp. 207–20. MIT Press.Google Scholar
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Nielsen, M., Simcock, G. & Jenkins, L. (in press) The effect of social engagement on 24-month-olds' imitation from live and televised models. Developmental Science.Google Scholar
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