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Steps to a neurochemistry of personality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 1999

Andrew D. Lawrence
Affiliation:
MRC Cyclotron Unit, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk Departments of Sensorimotor Systems and Psychological Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk
Matthias J. Koepp
Affiliation:
MRC Cyclotron Unit, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk Departments of Sensorimotor Systems and Psychological Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk
Roger N. Gunn
Affiliation:
MRC Cyclotron Unit, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk
Vincent J. Cunningham
Affiliation:
MRC Cyclotron Unit, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk
Paul M. Grasby
Affiliation:
MRC Cyclotron Unit, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk Departments of Sensorimotor Systems and Psychological Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, United Kingdomandrew@cu.rpms.ac.uk

Abstract

Depue & Collins's (D&C's) work relies on extrapolation from data obtained through studies in experimental animals, and needs support from studies of the role of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in human behaviour. Here we review evidence from two sources: (1) studies of patients with Parkinson's disease and (2) positron emission tomography (PET) studies of DA neurotransmission, which we believe lend support to Depue & Collins's theory, and which can potentially form the basis for a true neurochemistry of personality.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
© 1999 Cambridge University Press

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