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Two kinds of representational functionalism: Defusing the combinatorial explosion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2010

Joel Pust
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721jpust@ccit.arizona.edu

Abstract

Alvin Goldman (1993) presents three arguments against the psychological plausibility of representational functionalism (RF) as a theory of how subjects self-ascribe mental predicates. Goldman appears to construe RF as an account of attitude type self-ascription. His “combinatorial explosion” argument, however, proves devastating only to an implausible construal of RF as an account of attitude content self-ascription.

Type
Continuing Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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