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Ultrasociality without group selection: Possible, reasonable, and likely

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2016

Max M. Krasnow*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. krasnow@fas.harvard.eduhttp://projects.iq.harvard.edu/epl/people/max-krasnow

Abstract

It is uncontroversial that humans are extremely social, and that cultures have changed over time. But, the evidence shows that much of the social psychology underlying these phenomena (1) predates the agricultural transition, and (2) is not the result of group selection. Instead, this psychology appears intricately designed to capture social gains when possible in our complex ancestral social ecology.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

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