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Why decision making may not require awareness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 January 2014

I. P. L. McLaren
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
B. D. Dunn
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
N. S. Lawrence
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
F. N. Milton
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
F. Verbruggen
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
T. Stevens
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
A. McAndrew
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk
F. Yeates
Affiliation:
Washington Singer Laboratories, School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QG, United Kingdom. i.p.l.mclaren@exeter.ac.ukB.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.ukNatalia.Lawrence@exeter.ac.ukf.n.milton@ex.ac.ukF.L.J.Verbruggen@exeter.ac.ukt.stevens@ex.ac.ukam375@exeter.ac.ukfy212@exeter.ac.uk

Abstract

Newell & Shanks (N&S) argue against the idea that any significant role for unconscious influences on decision making has been established by research to date. Inasmuch as this conclusion applies to the idea of an “intelligent cognitive unconscious,” we would agree. Our concern is that the article could lead the unwary to conclude that there are no unconscious influences on decision making – and never could be. We give reasons why this may not be the case.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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