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Why we experience musical emotions: Intrinsic musicality in an evolutionary perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2008

Daniela Lenti Boero
Affiliation:
Faculty of Psychology, Université de la Vallée d'Aoste, I-11100 Aosta, Italyd.lentiboero@univda.it
Luciana Bottoni
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Milano Bicocca, 1-20126 Milan, Italy. bioacust.lab@unimib.itluciana.bottoni@unimib.itwww.disat.unimib.it/bioacoustics/it

Abstract

Taking into account an evolutionary viewpoint, we hypothesize that music could hide a universal and adaptive code determining preferences. We consider the possible selective pressure that might have shaped, at least in part, our emotional appreciation of sound and music, and sketch a comparison between parameters of some naturalistic sounds and music.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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