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BIZARRE chimpanzees do not represent “the chimpanzee”

  • David A. Leavens (a1), Kim A. Bard (a2) and William D. Hopkins (a3)

Abstract

Henrich et al. convincingly caution against the overgeneralization of findings from particular human populations, but fail to apply their own compelling reasoning to our nearest living relatives, the great apes. Here we argue that rearing history is every bit as important for understanding cognition in other species as it is in humans.

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References

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