Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-x64cq Total loading time: 0.24 Render date: 2022-05-23T11:43:21.025Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Article contents

Online CBT I: Bridging the Gap Between Eliza and Modern Online CBT Treatment Packages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2012

Fjóla Dögg Helgadóttir*
Affiliation:
Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, The University of Sydney. fjola@fjolad.com
Ross G. Menzies
Affiliation:
Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, The University of Sydney.
Mark Onslow
Affiliation:
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney.
Ann Packman
Affiliation:
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney.
Sue O'Brian
Affiliation:
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney.
*
*Address for correspondence: Fjola Dogg Helgadottir, Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Abstract

Reviews have demonstrated large effect sizes when using computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) protocols for treating anxiety, depression and health related concerns. However, the amount of therapist contact per user seems to be the most significant prognostic indicator. Thus, in some ways current online interventions can be viewed primarily as an extension of one-on-one therapy. The present article provides guidelines for targeting this limitation of online psychological interventions. The goal is to mimic the therapeutic relationship using a computer, without having any therapist involved. Consequently, thousands of users would be able to receive treatment simultaneously, reaching a wider audience, which was the initial goal of the online model. The development of a treatment program using file audit data is suggested as an alternative to having an individual therapist for each user. This is done by allowing the ‘computer psychologist’ to tailor individualised treatments for each user based on their psychological profile. The user is provided with individualised corrective feedback based on a set of prewritten responses to common faulty thoughts. A new paradigm is proposed for online treatment delivery.

Type
Standard Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
30
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Online CBT I: Bridging the Gap Between Eliza and Modern Online CBT Treatment Packages
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Online CBT I: Bridging the Gap Between Eliza and Modern Online CBT Treatment Packages
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Online CBT I: Bridging the Gap Between Eliza and Modern Online CBT Treatment Packages
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *