Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-nzrtw Total loading time: 0.257 Render date: 2022-12-01T17:45:47.621Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Social Training for Adolescents: Making Positive Steps

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2014

Alan Ralph*
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
Annette Spano
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
Heather Whitely
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
Linda Strong
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
Michael Parker
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
Wendy Pailthorpe
Affiliation:
Murdoch University
*
Psychology Department, Murdoch University, Murdoch WA 6150

Abstract

A rationale is provided for the development of a small group instructional approach to improving the competence of adolescents who reportedly experience difficulty making and maintaining friendships. Social problem-solving studies are briefly examined to provide support for such an approach, which is based on incorporating gradated in vivo assignments into the training process and using progress in these assignments as feedback for further assignment setting. The program, named STAMPS (Social Training for Adolescents: Making Positive Steps) is described in some detail and illustrated with data from a single case. Discussion deals with aspects of the program requiring further investigation, including the selection of peers as potential friends, and the need to modify the program to deal with broader adolescent issues including conflict with authority, teachers, and parents.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Achenbach, T.M., & Edelbrock, C. (1983). Manual for the Child Behavior Checklist and Revised Child Behavior Profile. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont Department of Psychiatry.Google Scholar
Bryant, B., & Trower, P.E. (1974). Social difficulty in a student sample. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 44, 1321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foxx, R.M., & Faw, G.D. (in press). Problem solving skills training for psychiatric inpatients: An analysis of generalisation. Behavioral Residential Treatment.Google Scholar
Foxx, R.M., Kyle, M.S., Faw, G.D., & Bittle, R.G. (1989a). Problem-solving skills training: Social validation and generalization. Behavioral Residential Treatment, 4, 269288.Google Scholar
Foxx, R.M., Kyle, M.S., Faw, G.D., & Bittle, R.G. (1989b). Teaching a problem-solving strategy to inpatient adolescents: Social validation and generalization. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 11, 7188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foxx, R.M., Marchand-Martella, N.E., Martella, R.C., Braunling-McMorrow, D., & McMorrow, M.J. (1988). Teaching a problem-solving strategy to closed head-injured adults. Behavioral Residential Treatment, 3, 193210.Google Scholar
Foxx, R.M., Martella, R.C., & Marchand-Martella, N.E. (1989). The acquisition, maintenance and generalisation of problem-solving skills by closed head-injured adults. Behavior Therapy, 20, 6176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hansen, D.J., St. Lawrence, J.S., & Christoff, K.A. (1985). Effects of interpersonal problemsolving training with chronic aftercare patients on problem-solving component skills and effectiveness of solutions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 167174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Margalit, M. (1991). Understanding loneliness among students with learning disabilities. Behaviour Change, 8, 167173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McFall, R.M. (1982). A review and reformulation of the concept of social skills. Behavioral Assessment, 4, 133.Google Scholar
Nowicki, S. Jr., & Strickland, B.R. (1973). A locus of control scale for children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 40, 148154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piers, E.V. (1969). Manual for the Piers-Harris Children's Self Concept Scale. Nashville, TN: Counselor Recordings and Tests.Google Scholar
Ralph, A. (1990). Social problem-solving: Why doesn't it work? The Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, 7, 510.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ralph, A., & Birnbrauer, J.S. (1986). The potential of correspondence training for the generalisation of social skills. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 7, 415429.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tisdelle, D.A., & St. Lawrence, J.S. (1988). Adolescent interpersonal problem-solving skill training: Social validation and generalisation. Behavior Therapy, 19, 171182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weist, M.D., Borden, M.C., Finney, J.W., & Ollendick, T.H. (1991). Social skills for children: Training empirically-derived target behaviours. Behaviour Change, 8, 174182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Social Training for Adolescents: Making Positive Steps
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Social Training for Adolescents: Making Positive Steps
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Social Training for Adolescents: Making Positive Steps
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *