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Associations Among Therapist Beliefs, Personal Resources and Burnout in Clinical Psychologists

  • Sally Emery (a1), Tracey D. Wade (a2) and Sara McLean (a3)

Abstract

There were two aims of the research with 190 Australian clinical psychologists: (1) to investigate the construct validity of the Therapist Belief Scale (TBS), and (2) to examine the relative contribution of demographics, workplace variables, and individual factors to burnout. Construct validity was examined using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and associations between the variables. Multivariate regressions were used to examine the relative contributions to burnout. The TBS showed three factors related to distress, inflexibility, and control, all of which were significantly associated with lower levels of personal accomplishment. Multivariate analyses showed emotional exhaustion to be associated being a woman, working for the government, having less personal resources, and endorsing more therapist beliefs related to control. Higher levels of personal accomplishment were significantly associated with a lower annual income, not having a mixed caseload, having more personal resources, and endorsing lower levels of therapist beliefs related to inflexibility and control.

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Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Professor Tracey Wade, School of Psychology, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia.

Keywords

Associations Among Therapist Beliefs, Personal Resources and Burnout in Clinical Psychologists

  • Sally Emery (a1), Tracey D. Wade (a2) and Sara McLean (a3)

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