Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Behavioural public policies and charitable giving

  • LUC BOVENS (a1)
Abstract

Some of the challenges in Sanders et al. (2018, this issue) can be aptly illustrated by means of charity nudges; that is, nudges designed to increase charitable donations. These nudges raise many ethical questions. First, Oxfam's triptychs with suggested donations are designed to increase giving. If successful, do our actions match ex ante or ex post preferences? Does this make a difference to the autonomy of the donor? Second, the Behavioural Insights Team conducted experiments using social networks to nudge people to give more. Do these appeals steer clear of exploiting power relations? Do they respect boundaries of privacy? Third, in an online campaign by Kiva, donors are asked to contribute directly to personalised initiatives. In many cases, the initiative has already been funded and donor money is funnelled to a new cause. Is such a ‘pre-disbursal’ arrangement truthful and true to purpose as a social business model?

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Behavioural public policies and charitable giving
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Behavioural public policies and charitable giving
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Behavioural public policies and charitable giving
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
References
Hide All
Behavioural Insights Team (2015), The Behavioural Insights Team Update 2013–2015. [Online] Available at: http://www.behaviouralinsights.co.uk/publications/the-behavioural-insights-team-update-report-2013-2015/ [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Cabinet Office (2010), MINDSPACE—Influencing Behaviour through Public Policy. [Online] Available at: https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/publications/mindspace [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Cabinet Office (2013), Applying Behavioural Insights to Charitable Giving. [Online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/applying-behavioural-insights-to-charitable-giving [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Fundraising Regulator (2016), Code of Fundraising Practice. [Online] Available at: https://www.fundraisingregulator.org.uk/code-of-fundraising-practice/code-of-fundraising-practice-v1-4-310717-docx/ [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Kiva (2018a), Kiva – Lend – Agriculture. [Online] Available at https://www.kiva.org/lend/agriculture [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Kiva (2018b), Kiva – How Kiva Works – How does the money for the loan get to each borrower? [Online] Available at: https://www.kiva.org/about/how [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Oxfam, (2018), Oxfam. Donate. [Online] Available at: https://www.oxfam.org.uk/donate [Accessed 17 Feb. 2018].
Sanders, M., Snijders, V., and Hallsworth, M. (2018), ‘Behavioural science and policy: where are we now and where are we going?’, Behavioural Public Policy, 2(2): 144167.
Zajonc, R. B. (1968), ‘Attitudinal Effects of Mere Exposure’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 9(2): pp. 127.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Behavioural Public Policy
  • ISSN: 2398-063X
  • EISSN: 2398-0648
  • URL: /core/journals/behavioural-public-policy
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed