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Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • ISSN: 1366-7289 (Print), 1469-1841 (Online)
  • Editors: Jubin Abutalebi Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Italy and Harald Clahsen Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, Germany
  • Editorial board
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition is an international peer-reviewed journal focusing on bilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic, and neuroscientific perspective. The aims of the journal are to promote research on the bilingual and multilingual person and to encourage debate in the field. Areas covered include: bilingual language competence, bilingual language processing, bilingual language acquisition in children and adults, bimodal bilingualism, neurolinguistics of bilingualism in normal and brain-damaged individuals, computational modelling of bilingual language competence and performance, and the study of cognitive functions in bilinguals. BLC carries articles and research notes on all aspects of the bilingual person, including articles presenting research methods and research tools pertinent to the field of bilingualism.

Recently published articles

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Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Where is Applied Linguistics headed? Cambridge Journal editors weigh in
  • 23 March 2018, Jen Malat
  • In advance of the upcoming AAAL Annual Meeting in Chicago, we asked editors of Cambridge applied linguistics journals for their thoughts on the state of the Where is applied linguistics headed? Are there new approaches, methods or priorities that you think will have real impact on research and related practice in coming years? Martha Crago, editor of Applied Psycholinguistics: “In the next year’s two major developments, one technological and one social, will have a striking impact on applied linguistics: 1)The disruptive technology of machine learning (artificial intelligence) is based on the early work on neural networks in neuropsychology as well as on reinforcement learning that was once considered a learning mechanism for language acquisition. These new technological developments are likely to circle back . . . → Read More: Where is Applied Linguistics headed? Cambridge Journal editors weigh in...
  • ‘World Englishes or English as a Lingua Franca: Where does English in China stand?
  • 13 March 2018, Dr Fan (Gabriel) Fang
  • Blog post based on an article in English Today  The spread and development of the English language has triggered debates about issues related to language ideology, identity, and ELT. China is an important context where the popularity of English use and English learning has generated various debates. In this paper, I discuss the use of the English language in China from the perspective of Global Englishes (GE) and I explore the debate about whether it should be positioned from the paradigm of World Englishes (WE) or English as a lingua franca (ELF). Essentially, the WE paradigm investigates different varieties of English in order to understand the various features of the language (including phonology, morphology, and syntax) as it is used in many post-colonial . . . → Read More: ‘World Englishes or English as a Lingua Franca: Where does English in China stand?...
  • Learning Construction Grammars Computationally
  • 27 February 2018, Jen Malat
  • Blog post by Jonathan Dunn, Ph.D. Construction Grammar, or CxG, takes a usage-based approach to describing grammar. In practice, this term usage-based means two different things: First, it means that idiomatic constructions belong in the grammar. For example, the ditransitive construction “John sent Mary a letter” has item-specific cases like “John gave Mary a hand” and “John gave Mary a hard time.” These idiomatic versions of the ditransitive have distinct meanings. While other grammatical paradigms consider these different meanings to be outside the scope of grammar, CxG argues that idiomatic constructions are actually an important part of grammar. Second, CxG is usage-based because it argues that we learn grammar by observing actual idiomatic usage: language is more nurture than nature. The role of innate . . . → Read More: Learning Construction Grammars Computationally...