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  • ISSN: 1366-7289 (Print), 1469-1841 (Online)
  • Editors: Jubin Abutalebi Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Italy and Harald Clahsen Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, Germany
  • Editorial board
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition is an international peer-reviewed journal focusing on bilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic, and neuroscientific perspective. The aims of the journal are to promote research on the bilingual and multilingual person and to encourage debate in the field. Areas covered include: bilingual language competence, bilingual language processing, bilingual language acquisition in children and adults, bimodal bilingualism, neurolinguistics of bilingualism in normal and brain-damaged individuals, computational modelling of bilingual language competence and performance, and the study of cognitive functions in bilinguals. BLC carries articles and research notes on all aspects of the bilingual person, including articles presenting research methods and research tools pertinent to the field of bilingualism.

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Other psycholinguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Figures of Speech Competition Winners
  • 16 October 2018, Katie
  • We are delighted to announce the winner of the Figures of Speech linguistics cartoon competition. Congratulations to Jonas B. Wittke (a graduate student at Rice University, USA) and Jonathan Maki (an art teacher in Minneapolis) for winning the iPad Pro, Apple Pen and £100 of CUP vouchers with their cartoon series Minimal Peers. The judges, including linguists, cartoonists and the CUP editorial team, thought the presentation of Minimal Peers was extremely professional and the cartoons funny with approachable and intelligent linguistic points. We will be publishing the full cartoon series on our Twitter and Facebook pages over the next six weeks beginning on Friday 19 October. Congratulations, too, to the three runners up who will each receive £100 of CUP books. Selina Sutton, Northumbria University Belinda Krottendorfer, . . . → Read More: Figures of Speech Competition Winners...
  • What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?
  • 19 July 2018, Katie
  • Blog post written by Gordana Lalic-Krstin and Nadezda Silaski, authors of the article ‘From Brexit to Bregret: An account of some Brexit-induced neologisms What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit? Judging by the material we collected from news media (broadcast and online), Facebook and Twitter, blogs and internet forums, the event  has generated a myriad of neologisms in English, using Brexit as a model or as a source word. Brexit  was modelled after Grexit, a word coined to denote the possibility of Greece leaving the Eurozone, giving rise to at least two more similarly coined blends, Spexit and Itexit, referring to the prospect of the same event in Spain and Italy. However, this was just a beginning . . . → Read More: What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?...
  • The grammar of engagement
  • 21 June 2018, Jen Malat
  • This blog post is written by Nicholas Evans, inspired by the Language and Cognition article “The grammar of engagement I: framework and initial exemplification” ‘Philosophy must plough over the whole of language’, as Wittgenstein famously stated. But which language? Singularising the noun allows a deceptive slippage between some language whose premises we take for granted (‘The limits of my language are the limits of my world’ was another great, and corrective, line of his) and ‘language’ in some dangerously, presumptively general sense. One of the great what-if questions for linguistics, philosophy and cognitive science is how different the last two millennia of western thought would be if we had built our . . . → Read More: The grammar of engagement...