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Balanced bilingualism and executive functioning in children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2015

RACHEL C. WEBER*
Affiliation:
University of British Columbia
AUDREA JOHNSON
Affiliation:
Frisco Independent School District
CYNTHIA A. RICCIO
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University
JEFFREY LIEW
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University
*
Address for Correspondence: Rachel C. Weber, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T1Z4rachel.weber@ubc.ca

Abstract

The extant research suggests bilingualism is associated with enhanced cognitive effects, most evident in attention and executive functioning (EF). The current study examined the contributions of balance in the bilingualism (Spanish–English) of children to performance-based measures and caregiver ratings of EF. Participants included 30 bilingual children. Balance in children's bilingualism was correlated with caregiver ratings of task initiation. After controlling for demographic variables, balance in bilingualism significantly accounted for 37% of the variance in ratings of children's task initiation. Additional research is needed regarding associations between dual-language exposure, linguistic competence, and cognitive development in children.

Type
Research Notes
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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