Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-dkhcg Total loading time: 0.142 Render date: 2021-06-18T01:53:40.939Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Conceptual representation in bilingual memory: Effects of concreteness and cognate status in word association

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2003

JANET G. VAN HELL
Affiliation:
University of Amsterdam
ANNETTE M. B. DE GROOT
Affiliation:
University of Amsterdam

Abstract

A word association experiment examined conceptual representation in bilingual memory. Dutch-English bilinguals associated twice to nouns and verbs that varied on concreteness and cognate status, once in the language of the stimuli (within-language), and once in the other language (between-language). Within- and between-language associations for concrete words and for cognates were more often translations of one another than those for abstract words and noncognates, and nouns evoked more translations than verbs. In both within- and between-language association, retrieving an associate was easier to concrete than to abstract words, to cognates than to noncognates, and to nouns than to verbs. These findings suggest that conceptual representation in bilingual memory depends on word-type and grammatical class: concrete translations, cognates, and noun translations more often share, or share larger parts of, a conceptual representation than abstract translations, noncognates, and verb translations. The results are discussed within the framework of distributed memory representation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1998 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

In carrying out this research, Janet G. van Hell was supported by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO, Grant 575-56-073). Part of this study was presented at the Ninth Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Würzburg, Germany, September 1996. We thank Evelien van Hell, Frans Padt, and Martin van Leerdam for their contributions to this study. We thank Alexandra Sholl, Anna Bosman, François Grosjean, Jim Clark, Judith Kroll, Marilyn Smith, and two anonymous reviewers for insightful comments on an earlier version of this paper.
251
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Conceptual representation in bilingual memory: Effects of concreteness and cognate status in word association
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Conceptual representation in bilingual memory: Effects of concreteness and cognate status in word association
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Conceptual representation in bilingual memory: Effects of concreteness and cognate status in word association
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *