Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-hlvcg Total loading time: 0.206 Render date: 2022-07-05T18:17:32.628Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Digital Language Learning and SLA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 September 2021

ZhaoHong Han*
Affiliation:
Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA
*
Address for correspondence: Dr. ZhaoHong Han, Teachers College, Columbia University, Box 66, 525 W. 120th Street. New York, NY10027. Email: han@tc.columbia.edu

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Peer Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bley-Vroman, R (1989) What is the logical problem of foreign language acquisition? In Gass, S and Schachter, J (eds), Linguistic perspectives on second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 4164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clahsen, H and Felser, C (2006) Continuity and shallow structures in language processing. Applied Psycholinguistics 27(1), 107126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, NC (2006) Selective Attention and Transfer Phenomena in L2 Acquisition: Contingency, Cue Competition, Salience, Interference, Overshadowing, Blocking, and Perceptual Learning. Applied Linguistics 27(2), 164194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, NC (2008) Usage-based and form-focused language acquisition: The associative learning of constructions, learned-attention, and the limited L2 endstate. In Robinson, P and Ellis, NC (eds), Handbook of cognitive linguistics and second language acquisition. London: Routledge, pp. 372405.Google Scholar
Ellis, R (1985) The L1=L2 Hypothesis: A reconsideration. System 13, 924.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Han, Z-H and Nassaji, H (2019) Introduction: A snapshot of thirty-five years of instructed second language acquisition. Language Teaching Research 23(4), 383402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hulstijn, JH (2015) Language proficiency in native and non-native speakers: Theory and research Amsterdam: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, P and Jeong, H (2020) The social brain of learning language: Grounding second language learning in social interaction. npj Science of Learning 19. doi:10.1038/s41539-020-0068-7Google ScholarPubMed
Li, P and Lan, Y-J (2021) Digital Language Learning (DLL): Insights from Behavior, Cognition, and the Brain. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1366728921000353CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loewen, S (2014) Introduction to instructed second language acquisition. New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loewen, S and Sato, M (Eds.). (2017) The Routledge handbook of instructed second language acquisition. New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Long, MH (2007) Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Norris, J and Ortega, L (2000) Effectiveness of L2 Instruction: A Research Synthesis and Quantitative Meta-analysis. Language Learning 50(3), 417528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schachter, J (1996) Learning and triggering in adult L2 acquisition. In Brown, G, Malmkjaer, K and Williams, J (eds), Performance and competence in SLA. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press pp. 7088.Google Scholar
Selinker, L (1972) Interlanguage. IRAL 10(2), 209231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sorace, A (2005) Selective optionality in language development. In Cornips, L and Corrigan, K (eds), Syntax and variation reconciling the biological and the social. Amsterdam: Benjamins, pp. 111160.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Digital Language Learning and SLA
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Digital Language Learning and SLA
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Digital Language Learning and SLA
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *