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L2 processing and memory retrieval: Some empirical and conceptual challenges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2016

GUNNAR JACOB
Affiliation:
University of Potsdam, Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism
SOL LAGO*
Affiliation:
University of Potsdam, Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism
CLARE PATTERSON
Affiliation:
University of Potsdam, Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism
*
Address for correspondence: Dr. Sol Lago, University of Potsdam, Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, Haus 2, Campus Golm, Karl-Liebknecht-Straße 24–25, 14476 Potsdam, Germanymarlago@uni-potsdam.de

Extract

Cunnings' keynote offers a new perspective on L2 processing by casting L1–L2 differences in terms of the memory system. One advantage of this approach is that it makes use of cue-based memory retrieval, a framework that has given rise to a wealth of research on L1 processing. However, there remain some questions about the evidence-base and predictions of the account, as well as conceptual challenges to its implementation.

Type
Peer Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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