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Multilingualism everywhere

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2011

DAVID LIGHTFOOT*
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Department of Linguistics, Box 571051, Intercultural Center 479, Washington, D.C. 20057-1051, USAlightd@georgetown.edu

Extract

If one asks how many languages there are, one can imagine at least three answers: one, over six billion, or 7,358.

Type
Peer Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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