Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-fpk9s Total loading time: 0.369 Render date: 2022-10-07T05:46:20.140Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

The role of phonological structure and experience in bilingual children's nonword repetition performance*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2014

TODD A. GIBSON*
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
CONNIE SUMMERS
Affiliation:
University of Texas at El Paso
ELIZABETH D. PEÑA
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
LISA M. BEDORE
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
RONALD B. GILLAM
Affiliation:
Utah State University
THOMAS M. BOHMAN
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
*
Address for correspondence Todd A. Gibson, Louisiana State University, 84 Hatcher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USAtoddandrewgibson@gmail.com

Abstract

The current study examined the influence of phonological structure and language experience on the nonword repetition performance of bilingual children. Twenty-six Spanish-dominant and 26 English-dominant Spanish–English bilingual five-year-old children were matched on current exposure to the dominant language and year of first exposure to English. Participants repeated non-wordlike nonwords in English and Spanish. The Spanish-dominant group performed better than the English-dominant group for both Spanish and English nonwords. In addition, there was a main effect for test language, where Spanish nonwords were produced more accurately than English nonwords overall. The Spanish-dominant group advantage for nonwords is interpreted as emerging from the extra practice the dominant Spanish speakers had producing multisyllabic words.

Type
Research Notes
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

This work was supported by the grant 1 R01 DC007439–01 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Special thanks to the families that participated in the study, as well as to Anita Méndez Pérez and Chad Bingham for their coordination of data collection, the interviewers who collected data, and the school districts that allowed us to collect data for the project. Thanks also for the invaluable suggestions provided by our referees. Dr. Gibson is now at Louisiana State University.

References

Adams, A., & Gathercole, S. E. (1996). Phonological working memory and spoken language development in young children. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Section A: Human Experimental Psychology, 49, 216233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bedore, L. M., Peña, E. D., Joyner, D., & Macken, C. (2011). Parent and teacher rating of bilingual language proficiency and language development concerns. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 14, 489511.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bohman, T. M., Bedore, L. M., Peña, E. D., Mendez-Perez, A., & Gillam, R. B. (2010). What you hear and what you say: Language performance in Spanish–English bilinguals. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 13, 325344.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bracken, B. A., & McCallum, R. S. (1998). Universal nonverbal intelligence test. Itasca, IL: Riverside.Google Scholar
Bybee, J. (2010). Language, usage and cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bybee, J., & Hopper, P. (eds.). (2001). Frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calderón, J. (2003). Working memory in Spanish–English bilinguals with language impairment. San Diego, CA: University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University.Google Scholar
Cheung, H. (1996). Nonword span as a unique predictor of second-language vocabulary language. Developmental Psychology, 32, 867873.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Houwer, A. (2007). Parental language input patterns and children's bilingual use. Applied Psycholinguistics, 28, 411424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
D’Odorico, L., Assanelli, A., Franco, F., & Jacob, V. (2007). A follow-up study on Italian late talkers: Development of language, short-term memory, phonological awareness, impulsiveness, and attention. Applied Psycholinguistics, 28, 157169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dollaghan, C., & Campbell, T. F. (1998). Nonword repetition and child language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 41, 11361146.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ebert, K. D., Kalanek, J., Cordero, K. N., & Kohnert, K. (2008). Spanish nonword repetition stimuli development and preliminary results. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 29, 6774.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, N. C. (2008). The dynamics of second language emergence: Cycles of language use, language change, and language acquisition. The Modern Language Journal, 92, 232249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fenk, A., & Fenk-Oczlon, G. (1993). Menzerath's law and the constant flow of linguistic information. In Kohler, R. & Rieger, B. B. (eds.), Contributions to quantitative linguistics, pp. 1131. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fenk-Oczlon, G., & Fenk, A. (2008). Complexity trade-offs between the subsystems of language. In Miestamo, M., Sinnemäki, K. & Karlsson, F. (eds.), Language complexity: Typology, contact, change, pp. 4365. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flege, J. (2003). Assessing constraints on second-language segmental production and perception. In Meyer, A. & Schiller, N. (eds.), Phonetics and phonology in language comprehension and production, differences and similarities, pp. 319355. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
French, L. M., & O’Brien, I. (2008). Phonological memory and children's second language grammar learning. Applied Psycholinguistics, 29, 463487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gathercole, S. E., & Baddeley, A. (1993). Working memory and language. Hillsdale, NJ: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Gathercole, S. E., Frankish, C., Pickering, S., & Peaker, S. (1999). Phonotactic influences on short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 25, 8495.Google ScholarPubMed
Gathercole, S. E., Pickering, S., Ambridge, B., & Wearing, H. (2004). The structure of working memory from 4 to 15 years of age. Developmental Psychology, 40, 177190.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gathercole, S. E., Willis, C., Emslie, H., & Baddeley, A. (1991). The influences of number of syllables and wordlikeness on children's repetition of nonwords. Applied Psycholinguistics, 12, 349367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gijsel, M. A. R., Bosman, A. M. T., & Verhoeven, L. (2006). Kindergarten risk factors, cognitive factors, and teacher judgments as predictors of early reading in Dutch. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39, 558571.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gillam, R. B., Peña, E. D., Bedore, L. M., Bohman, T., & Mendez-Perez, A. (2013). Identification of specific language impairment in bilingual children, part 1: Assessment in English. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56, 18131823.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Girbau, D., & Schwartz, R. G. (2007). Non-word repetition in Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 42, 5975.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Girbau, D., & Schwartz, R. G. (2008). Phonological working memory in Spanish–English bilingual children with and without specific language impairment. Journal of Communication Disorders, 41, 124145.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gollan, T. H., & Goldrick, M. (2012). Does bilingualism twist your tongue? Cognition, 125, 491497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Green, S. B., & Salkind, N. J. (2011). Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and understanding data. Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Guiberson, M., & Rodriguez, B. L. (2013). Classification accuracy of nonword repetition when used with preschool-age Spanish-speaking children. Language Speech & Hearing Services in Schools, 44, 121132.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gutiérrez-Clellen, V. F., & Kreiter, J. (2003). Understanding child bilingual acquisition using parent and teacher reports. Applied Psycholinguistics, 24, 267288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gutiérrez-Clellen, V. F., & Simon-Cereijido, G. (2010). Using nonword repetition tasks for the identification of language impairment in Spanish–English-speaking children: Does the language of assessment matter? Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 25, 4858.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hammond, R. M. (2001). The sounds of Spanish: Analysis and application (with special reference to American English). Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.Google Scholar
Hulme, C., Maughan, S., & Brown, G. D. A. (1991). Memory for familiar and unfamiliar words: evidence for a long-term memory contribution to short-term memory span. Journal of Memory and Language, 30, 685701.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klein, D., Watkins, K. E., Zatorre, R. J., & Milner, B. (2005). Word and nonword repetition in bilingual subjects: A PET study. Human Brain Mapping, 27, 153161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kohnert, K., Windsor, J., & Yim, D. (2006). Do language-based processing tasks separate children with language impairment from typical bilinguals? Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 21, 1929.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kroll, J. F., & Stewart, E. (1994). Category interference in translation and picture naming: Evidence for asymmetric connections between bilingual memory representations. Journal of Memory and Language, 33, 149174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Langacker, R. W. (1997). The contextual basis of cognitive semantics. In Nuyts, J. & Pederson, E. (eds.), Language and conceptualization, pp. 229253. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacWhinney, B. (2005). A unified model of language acquisition. In Kroll, J. F. & de Groot, A. M. B. (eds.), Handbook of bilingualism: Psycholinguistic approaches, pp. 4967. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Maddieson, I., & Disner, S. F. (1984). Patterns of sounds. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Masoura, E. V., & Gathercole, S. E. (1999). Phonological short-term memory and foreign language learning. International Journal of Psychology, 34, 383388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Masoura, E. V., & Gathercole, S. E. (2005). Phonological short-term memory skills and new word learning in young Greek children. Memory, 13, 422429.Google Scholar
Munson, B., Kurtz, B. A., & Windsor, J. (2005). The influence of vocabulary size, phonotactic probability, and wordlikeness on nonword repetitions of children with and without language impairments. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 48, 10331047.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Namazi, M., & Thordardottir, E. T. (2010). A working memory, not bilingual advantage, in controlled attention. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 13, 597616.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Navarro, T. (1968). Studies in Spanish phonology. Coral Gables, FL: University of Miami Press.Google Scholar
Nettle, D. (1995). Segmental inventory size, word length, and communicative efficiency. Linguistics, 33, 359367.Google Scholar
Nettle, D. (1998). Coevolution of phonology and the lexicon in twelve languages of West Africa. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, 5, 240245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nettle, D. (2012). Social scale and structural complexity in human languages. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367 (1597), 18291836.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oller, D. K., Pearson, B. Z., & Cobo-Lewis, A. B. (2007). Profile effects in early bilingual language and literacy. Applied Psycholinguistics, 28, 191230.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parra, M., Hoff, E., & Core, C. (2011). Relations among language exposure, phonological memory, and language development in Spanish–English bilingually developing 2-year-olds. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 108, 113125.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peña, E., Gutiérrez-Clellen, V., Iglesias, A., Goldstein, B., & Bedore, L. (2014). Bilingual English–Spanish Assessment (BESA). San Rafael, CA: AR-Clinical Publications.Google Scholar
Radeborg, K., Barthelom, E., Sjöberg, M., & Sahlén, B. (2006). A Swedish non-word repetition test for preschool children. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 47, 187192.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Records, N. L., & Tomblin, J. B. (1994). Clinical decision making: Describing the decision rules of practicing speech-language pathologists. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 37, 144156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Restrepo, M. A. (1998). Identifiers of predominantly Spanish-speaking children with language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 41, 13981411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Santos, F. H., Bueno, O. F. A., & Gathercole, S. E. (2006). Errors in nonword repetition: Bridging short- and long-term memory. Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, 39, 371385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shriberg, L. D., & Kent, R. D. (1982). Clinical phonetics. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Stokes, S. F., Wong, A. M. Y., Fletcher, P., & Leonard, L. B. (2006). Nonword repetition and sentence repetition as clinical markers of specific language impairment: The case of Cantonese. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49, 219236.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Summers, C., Bohman, T. M., Gillam, R. B., Peña, E. D., & Bedore, L. (2010). Bilingual performance on nonword repetition in Spanish and English. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 45, 480493.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thordardottir, E. T., & Brandeker, M. (2012). The effect of bilingual exposure versus language impairment on nonword repetition and sentence imitation scores. Journal of Communication Disorders, 46, 116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thordardottir, E. T., & Juliusdottir, A. G. (2012). Icelandic as a second language: A longitudinal study of language knowledge and processing by school-age children. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 16, 411435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorn, A. S. C., & Gathercole, S. E. (1999). Language-specific knowledge and short-term memory in bilingual and non-bilingual children. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Section A: Human Experimental Psycology, 52, 303324.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thorn, A. S. C., Gathercole, S. E., & Frankish, C. R. (2002). Language familiarity effects in short-term memory: The role of output delay and long-term knowledge. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Section A: Human Experimental Psycology, 55, 13631383.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thorn, A. S. C., Gathercole, S. E., & Frankish, C. R. (2005). Redintegration and the benefits of long-term knowledge in verbal short-term memory: An evaluation of Schweickert's (1993) multinomial processing tree model. Cognitive Psychology, 50, 133158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tomasello, M. (2003). Constructing a language: A usage-based approach to child language acquisition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Weismer, S. E., Tomblin, J. B., Zhang, X., Buckwalter, P., Chynoweth, J. G., & Jones, M. (2000). Nonword repetition performance in school-age children with and without language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 43, 865878.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Windsor, J., Kohnert, K., Lobitz, K. F., & Pham, G. T. (2010). Cross-language nonword repetition by bilingual and monolingual children. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 19, 298310.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The role of phonological structure and experience in bilingual children's nonword repetition performance*
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The role of phonological structure and experience in bilingual children's nonword repetition performance*
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The role of phonological structure and experience in bilingual children's nonword repetition performance*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *