Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

L3 acquisition: A focus on cognitive approaches*

  • MARÍA DEL PILAR GARCÍA MAYO (a1) and JORGE GONZÁLEZ ALONSO (a1)

Abstract

Interest in third language (L3) acquisition has increased exponentially in recent years, due to its potential to inform long-lasting debates in theoretical linguistics, language acquisition and psycholinguistics. From the very beginning, researchers investigating child and adult L3 acquisition have considered the many diverse cognitive factors that constrain and condition the initial state and development of newly acquired languages, and their models have duly evolved to incorporate insights from the most recent findings in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and cognitive psychology. The articles in this Special Issue of Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, in dealing with issues such as age of acquisition, attrition, relearning, cognitive economy or the reliance on different memory systems – to name but a few – provide an accurate portrayal of current inquiry in the field, and are a particularly fine example of how instrumental research in language acquisition and other cognitive domains can be to each other.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      L3 acquisition: A focus on cognitive approaches*
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      L3 acquisition: A focus on cognitive approaches*
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      L3 acquisition: A focus on cognitive approaches*
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: María del Pilar García Mayo, Departamento de Filología Inglesa, Paseo de la Universidad 5, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain mariapilar.garciamayo@ehu.es

Footnotes

Hide All
*

With the exception of the paper by Cristina Sanz, Hae In Park and Beatriz Lado, all the papers collected in this Special Issue were presented at the seminar Third Language (L3) Acquisition: A Focus on Cognitive Approaches, which took place at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) in Vitoria-Gasteiz on May 24–25, 2012. The seminar could not have been organised without the funding support provided by two grants, from the Basque Government (IT311–10) and from the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (UFI 11/06), respectively.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Bardel, C., & Falk, Y. (2007). The role of the second language in third language acquisition: The case of Germanic syntax. Second Language Research, 23, 459484.
Bates, E., & MacWhinney, B. (1987). Competition, variation, and language learning. In MacWhinney, B. (ed.), Mec-hanisms of language acquisition, pp. 157193. Hilsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
de Bot, K. (2012). Rethinking multilingual processing: From a static to a dynamic approach. In Cabrelli Amaro, J., Flynn, S. & Rothman, J. (eds.), Third language acquisition in adulthood, pp. 7993. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Falk, Y., & Bardel, C. (2011). Object pronouns in German L3 syntax: Evidence for the L2 Status Factor. Second Language Research, 27, 5982.
Flynn, S., Foley, C., & Vinnitskaya, I. (2004). The Cumulative-Enhancement Model for language acquisition: Comparing adults’ and children's patterns of development in first, second and third language acquisition of relative clauses. The International Journal of Multilingualism, 1, 316.
Hall, C. J. (2002). The automatic cognate form assumption: Evidence for the parasitic model of vocabulary development. International Review of Applied Linguistics, 40, 6987.
Hall, C. J., & Ecke, P. (2003). Parasitism as a default mechanism in L3 vocabulary acquisition. In Cenoz, J., Hufeisen, B. & Jessner, U. (eds.), The multilingual lexicon, pp. 7185. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
Iverson, M. (2009). N-drop at the initial state of L3 Portuguese: Comparing simultaneous and additive bilinguals of English/Spanish. In Pires, A. & Rothman, J. (eds.), Mini-malist inquiries into child and adult language acquisition: Case studies across Portuguese, pp. 221244. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Paradis, M. (1994). Neurolinguistic aspects of implicit and explicit memory: Implications for bilingualism. In Ellis, N. C. (ed.), Implicit and explicit learning of second languages, pp. 393419. London: Academic Press.
Paradis, M. (2009). Declarative and procedural determinants of second languages. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Rothman, J. (2010). On the typological economy of syntactic transfer: Word order and relative clause high/low attachment preference in L3 Brazilian Portuguese. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching (IRAL), 48, 245273.
Rothman, J. (2013). Cognitive economy, non-redundancy and typological primacy in L3 acquisition: Evidence from initial stages of L3 Romance. In Baauw, S., Dirjkoningen, F. & Pinto, M. (eds.), Romance languages and linguistic theory 2011, pp. 217247. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Schwartz, B., & Sprouse, R. (1996). L2 cognitive states and the Full Transfer/Full Access model. Second Language Research, 12, 4072.
Sorace, A. (2011). Pinning down the concept of “interface” in bilingualism. Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 1, 134.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed