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Language selection contributes to intrusion errors in speaking: Evidence from picture naming

  • Xiaochen Zheng (a1), Ardi Roelofs (a2) and Kristin Lemhöfer (a2)

Abstract

Bilinguals usually select the right language to speak for the particular context they are in, but sometimes the nontarget language intrudes. Despite a large body of research into language selection and language control, it remains unclear where intrusion errors originate from. These errors may be due to incorrect selection of the nontarget language at the conceptual level, or be a consequence of erroneous word selection (despite correct language selection) at the lexical level. We examined the former possibility in two language switching experiments using a manipulation that supposedly affects language selection on the conceptual level, namely whether the conversational language context was associated with the target language (congruent) or with the alternative language (incongruent) on a trial. Both experiments showed that language intrusion errors occurred more often in incongruent than in congruent contexts, providing converging evidence that language selection during concept preparation is one driving force behind language intrusion.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Xiaochen Zheng, E-mail: x.zheng@donders.ru.nl

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Keywords

Language selection contributes to intrusion errors in speaking: Evidence from picture naming

  • Xiaochen Zheng (a1), Ardi Roelofs (a2) and Kristin Lemhöfer (a2)

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