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A case for psychosocial interventions to prevent mental illness: COMMENTARY ON… THE PSYCHOSIS RISK TIMELINE

  • Tom K. J. Craig (a1)

Summary

The development of effective preventions for psychosis is hindered by conceptual challenges underlying diagnosis and the fact that few of the many biological risk factors identified to date are sufficiently well understood to form the basis of a targeted intervention. On the other hand, a great deal is known of the psychosocial conditions that increase the lifetime risk of most mental illnesses: surely enough to justify better resourcing of interventions focused on antenatal care and the emotional well-being of children from the early years through adolescence, where as much as a half of all mental ill health has its roots.

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Corresponding author

Correspondence Professor Tom K. J. Craig, Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: thomas.craig@kcl.ac.uk

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References

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Burstow, P, Newbigging, K, Tew, J, et al. (2018) Investing in a Resilient Generation: Keys to a Mentally Prosperous Nation. University of Birmingham.
Marmot, M (2010) Fair Society, Healthy Lives: The Marmot Review. Strategic Review of Health Inequalities in England Post 2010. Marmot Review.
Romain, K, Eriksson, A, Onyon, R, et al. (2019a) The psychosis risk timeline: can we improve our preventive strategies? Part 1: early life. BJPsych Advances, 25.
Romain, K, Eriksson, A, Onyon, R, et al. (2019b) The psychosis risk timeline: can we improve our preventive strategies? Part 2: adolescence and adulthood. BJPsych Advances, 25.
Romain, K, Eriksson, A, Onyon, R, et al. (2019c) The psychosis risk timeline: can we improve our preventive strategies? Part 3: primary common pathways and preventive strategies. BJPsych Advances, 25.
Siegenthaler, E, Munder, T, Egger, M (2012) Effect of preventive interventions in mentally ill parents on the mental health of the offspring: systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51: 817.
Smith, S, Li, J, Garbett, K, et al. (2007) Maternal immune activation alters fetal brain development through interleukin-6. The Journal of Neuroscience, 27: 10695–702.

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A case for psychosocial interventions to prevent mental illness: COMMENTARY ON… THE PSYCHOSIS RISK TIMELINE

  • Tom K. J. Craig (a1)
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