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Death by PowerPoint: alternatives for life

  • Richard M. Duffy and Marian Henry
Summary

The use of PowerPoint has become nearly ubiquitous in medical education and continuing professional development; however, many alternatives are emerging that can be used in its place. These may confer some advantages, but they also have potential drawbacks. It is helpful that educators are aware of these new presentation options and their pros and cons, including any financial implications and issues of data protection. This article considers the role of technology in teaching and learning, identifying underlying assumptions that are often made. It identifies and appraises technology that can be used with or instead of PowerPoint to best facilitate deep learning. The potential pedagogical benefits and practical limitations of these technologies are considered, and strategies are highlighted to maximise the impact of PowerPoint where it is the software of choice.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Richard M. Duffy, Department of Adult Psychiatry, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, 63 Eccles Street Dublin 7, Ireland. Email: duffyrm@gmail.com
Footnotes
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LEARNING OBJECTIVES

• Consider the role of information communication technology in teaching and learning

• Identify and appraise potential technology that may enhance the use of PowerPoint in educational settings

• Identify and appraise alternatives to standard presentation software that may aid the learning experience

DECLARATION OF INTEREST

None

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 2056-4678
  • EISSN: 2056-4686
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Death by PowerPoint: alternatives for life

  • Richard M. Duffy and Marian Henry
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