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Predatory journals and dubious publishers: how to avoid being their prey

  • Steve Kisely (a1)
Summary

Open access publishing has a dark side, the predatory publishers and journals that exist for revenue rather than scholarly activity. This article helps researchers to: (1) identify some of the commonly used tactics and characteristics of predatory publishing; and (2) avoid falling prey to them. In summary, authors should choose the journal for submission themselves and never respond to unsolicited emails. It is also important to check blacklists such as ‘Stop Predatory Journals’ and whitelists such the Directory of Open Access Journals.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After reading this article, readers should be able to do the following:

  • be aware of the dangers of predatory journals and publishers
  • use blacklists of predatory journals and publishers’ whitelists of legitimate open access journals
  • be aware of warning signs that might suggest a predatory journal or publisher.

DECLARATION OF INTEREST

S.K. is on the editorial board of BJPsych International. He also receives five to ten spam emails a day from predatory journals and publishers.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Steve Kisely, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Level 4, Building 1, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia. Email: s.kisely@uq.edu.au
References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 2056-4678
  • EISSN: 2056-4686
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Predatory journals and dubious publishers: how to avoid being their prey

  • Steve Kisely (a1)
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