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An evaluation of the characteristics and outcomes of users of a street triage service: retrospective case note review

  • Andrew Molodynski (a1) (a2), Sarah Hollingsworth (a1), Louise Penzenstadler (a1) (a3), Devon Perfect (a1) and Stephen Puntis (a2)...
Abstract
Aims and method

Street triage services are now common but the population they serve is poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate a local service to determine the characteristics of those using it and their outcomes in the 90 day period following contact.

Results

We found that there were high levels of service use and that the vast majority of contacts were via telephone rather than in person. Street triage was used by both existing secondary mental health patients and non-patients. Follow-up rates with secondary services were high in the former and low in the latter case.

Implications

Services are very busy where they exist and may be replacing traditional crisis services. It is not apparent that they work to increase follow-up among those using them, unless they are already in contact with services. In this service, although there was a joint response model nearly all responses were provided by telephone.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Andrew Molodynski (andrew.molodynski@oxfordhealth.nhs.uk)
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
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An evaluation of the characteristics and outcomes of users of a street triage service: retrospective case note review

  • Andrew Molodynski (a1) (a2), Sarah Hollingsworth (a1), Louise Penzenstadler (a1) (a3), Devon Perfect (a1) and Stephen Puntis (a2)...
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