Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Debate: Can and should psychiatrists use online information?

  • Elly O'Brien (a1) and Christopher Pell (a2)
Extract

When considering professional use of the internet, the focus tends to be on access to information. Yet the development of Web 2.0 and the growth of social media have transformed the internet from a largely read-only medium to one that facilitates interaction and user-created content. I will discuss some of the positive effects that online resources can have on professional practice, looking not just at access to information, but what we do with that information and how we interact online with fellow professionals and the public.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Debate: Can and should psychiatrists use online information?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Debate: Can and should psychiatrists use online information?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Debate: Can and should psychiatrists use online information?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
1 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. NICE apps for smartphones and tablets (https://www.nice.org.uk/about/what-we-do/nice-apps-for-smartphones-and-tablets).
2 Brassey, J. Trip Rapid Reviews – Systematic Reviews in Five Minutes (http://blog.tripdatabase.com/2013/10/trip-rapid-reviews-systematic-reviews.html).
3 Reavley, NJ, Mackinnon, AJ, Morgan, AJ, Alvarez-Jimenez, M, Hetrick, SE, Killackey, E, et al. Quality of information sources about mental disorders: a comparison of Wikipedia with centrally controlled web and printed sources. Psychol Med 2012; 42: 1753–62.
4 Nature. Nature's responses to Encyclopaedia Britannica (http://www.nature.com/nature/britannica/index.html).
5 NHS Choices. NHS Choices: Your Health, Your Choices (http://www.nhs.uk/).
6 NHS England. The Information Standard (http://www.england.nhs.uk/tis/).
7 Royal College of Psychiatrists. About Our Leaflets (http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/moreinformation/aboutourleaflets.aspx).
9 Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. International Psychiatry Twitter Journal Club (http://www.psychiatry.utoronto.ca/international-psychiatry-twitter-journal-club/).
10 MentalHealthGov. National Conference on Mental Health (https://storify.com/MentalHealthGov/national-conference-on-mental-health).
11 BBC News UK. Asda and Tesco withdraw Halloween patient outfits (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24278768).
12 General Medical Council. Doctor's Use of Social Media (http://www.gmc-uk.org/Doctors__use_of_social_media.pdf_51448306.pdf). GMC, 2013.
13 Facebook. Facebook newsroom – company info (http://newsroom.fb.com/company-info/).
14 Yung, K, Eickhoff, E, Davis, DL, Klam, WP, Doan, AP. Internet addiction disorder and problematic use of Google Glass in patient treated at a residential substance abuse treatment program. Addict Behav 2015; 41: 5860.
16 Ophir, E, Nass, C, Wagner, AD. Cognitive control in media multitaskers. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2009; 106: 15583–7.
17 Adler, RF, Benbunan-Fich, R. Juggling on a high wire: multitasking effects on performance. Int J Hum Computer Stud 2012; 70: 156–68.
18 Bohannon, J. Who's afraid of peer review? Science 2013; 342: 60–5.
19 Giustini, D, Kamel Boulos, MN. Google Scholar is not enough to be used alone for systematic reviews. Online J Public Health Inform 2013; 5: 214.
20 Chretien, KC, Greysen, S, Chretien, J, Kind, T. Online posting of unprofessional content by medical students. JAMA 2009; 302: 1309–15.
21 Moubarak, G, Guiot, A, Benhamou, Y, Benhamou, A, Hariri, S. Facebook activity of residents and fellows and its impact on the doctor–patient relationship. J Med Ethics 2011; 37: 101–4.
22 Pathé, MT, Meloy, JR. Commentary: Stalking by patients – psychiatrists' tales of anger, lust and ignorance. J Am Acad Psychiatry Law 2013; 41: 200–5.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 23 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 81 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Debate: Can and should psychiatrists use online information?

  • Elly O'Brien (a1) and Christopher Pell (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *