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Depression, memory and electroconvulsive therapy

  • Rudi Coetzer (a1) (a2)
Summary

Current neuroscience suggests that although short-term memory difficulties frequently occur immediately after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), longer-term problems are less common. However, gaps in our knowledge remain regarding longer-term cognitive problems after ECT, including memory function. Some of these relate to the complexities surrounding cognitive testing and interpretation of test results. An important question in clinical decision-making is why, despite current evidence suggesting long-term memory problems are less frequent, some patients still report subjective memory difficulties. To further advance clinical practice and the neuroscience surrounding post-ECT cognitive function, assessment of cognitive function, possibly including neuropsychological testing, should potentially become more routine as part of clinical practice.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Dr Rudi Coetzer (b.r.coetzer@bangor.ac.uk)
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Depression, memory and electroconvulsive therapy

  • Rudi Coetzer (a1) (a2)
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