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Epistemic injustice in psychiatry

  • Paul Crichton (a1), Havi Carel (a2) and Ian James Kidd (a3)
Summary

It has been argued that those who suffer from medical conditions are more vulnerable to epistemic injustice (a harm done to a person in their capacity as an epistemic subject) than healthy people. This editorial claims that people with mental disorders are even more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than those with somatic illnesses. Two kinds of contributory factors are outlined, global and specific. Some suggestions are made to counteract the effects of these factors, for instance, we suggest that physicians should participate in groups where the subjective experience of patients is explored, and learn to become more aware of their own unconscious prejudices towards psychiatric patients.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Paul Crichton (paulcrichton@doctors.org.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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1 Fricker, M. Epistemic Injustice: Power and The Ethics of Knowing. Oxford University Press, 2007.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Epistemic injustice in psychiatry

  • Paul Crichton (a1), Havi Carel (a2) and Ian James Kidd (a3)
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