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Exploring stigma and its effect on access to mental health services in unaccompanied refugee children

  • Pallab Majumder (a1)

Abstract

Aims and method

Despite substantial evidence to show that unaccompanied refugee children suffer a high prevalence of mental illness, their access to services remains poor. One may hypothesise that this is associated with their negative perceptions of mental illness. However, there has been little research exploring this important subject. We aimed to explore unaccompanied refugee children's experiences, perceptions and beliefs of mental illness, focusing on stigma. Fifteen unaccompanied refugee children and 15 carers were interviewed by a semi-structured interview. Thematic analysis was used to analyse data.

Results

Three main themes were identified, focusing mainly on issues of stigma related to mental health, mental illness and their treatment, and they were interpreted in detail.

Clinical implications

Our findings will contribute to current understanding of stigma and discrimination, and their effect on service engagement, and will hopefully stimulate interest to further explore this area and develop potential solutions.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Pallab Majumder (pallab.majumder@nottshc.nhs.uk)

References

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Exploring stigma and its effect on access to mental health services in unaccompanied refugee children

  • Pallab Majumder (a1)
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