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Family-inclusive practice in a psychiatric intensive care unit

  • Rosemary Sedgwick (a1), Alexa Duff (a2), Sharon Lines (a3), Anthony Akenzua (a3) and Fergal Jones (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends involving the families of patients admitted to psychiatric hospital care, without specific guidance on how to do it. To improve family involvement in a National Health Service psychiatric intensive care unit, a relatives' and carers' clinic was set up. Fifty family members attended and completed questionnaires. Nine went on to take part in interviews, the results of which were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results

Families felt more informed and found the increased access to information useful. They felt that the process showed respect for them and their family member, and that their contribution was valued. Running throughout the interviews was the contrast with previous experiences; families reported feeling heard and understood and attributed this in part to timing and environment.

Clinical implications

The clinic was viewed positively by families and met the trust's commitment to including carers, as well as national guidance which suggests it should be part of routine practice.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Rosemary Sedgwick (rosemary.sedgwick@kcl.ac.uk)
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Family-inclusive practice in a psychiatric intensive care unit

  • Rosemary Sedgwick (a1), Alexa Duff (a2), Sharon Lines (a3), Anthony Akenzua (a3) and Fergal Jones (a4)...
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