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Flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) model in specialist psychosis teams: An evaluation

  • Loopinder Sood (a1), Andy Owen (a1), Richard Onyon (a1), Aarohi Sharma (a1), Jessica Nigriello (a2), Dominic Markham (a1) and Hannah Seabrook (a1)...
Abstract
Aims and method

The impact of flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) has been observed in people previously supported by assertive community treatment (ACT) teams, but its effect on those previously with a community mental health team (CMHT) has not been studied in the UK. An observational study was conducted of 380 people from 3 CMHTs and 95 people from an ACT team, all with a history of psychosis, following service reconfiguration to 3 FACT teams.

Results

People previously with a CMHT required less time in hospital when the FACT model was introduced. A smaller reduction was observed in people coming from the ACT team. Both groups required less crisis resolution home treatment (CRHT) team input.

Clinical implications

FACT may be a better model than standard CMHT care for people with a history of psychosis, as a result of reduced need for acute (CRHT and inpatient) services.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Andy Owen (andy.owen@covwarkpt.nhs.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) model in specialist psychosis teams: An evaluation

  • Loopinder Sood (a1), Andy Owen (a1), Richard Onyon (a1), Aarohi Sharma (a1), Jessica Nigriello (a2), Dominic Markham (a1) and Hannah Seabrook (a1)...
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