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Intelligent outcome measures in liaison psychiatry: essential even if not desirable: Commentary on … a multidimensional Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP)

  • George Tadros (a1)
Summary

Service development is guided by outcome measures that inform service commissioners and providers. Those in liaison psychiatry should be encouraged to develop a positive approach that integrates the collection of outcome measures into everyday clinical practice. The Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP) is a very useful tool to measure service quality and clinical effectiveness, using a combination of clinician-rated and patient-rated outcome measures and patient-rated experience measures. However, it does not include measures of cost-effectiveness or training activities. The FROM-LP is a significant step towards developing nationally unified outcome measures.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to George Tadros (george.tadros@nhs.net)
Footnotes
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See special article, pp. 192–194, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
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Intelligent outcome measures in liaison psychiatry: essential even if not desirable: Commentary on … a multidimensional Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP)

  • George Tadros (a1)
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