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It is time to bring borderline intellectual functioning back into the main fold of classification systems

  • Jannelien Wieland (a1) and Frans G. Zitman (a2)
Summary

Borderline intellectual functioning is an important and frequently unrecognised comorbid condition relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of any and all psychiatric disorders. In the DSM-IV-TR, it is defined by IQ in the 71–84 range. In DSM–5, IQ boundaries are no longer part of the classification, leaving the concept without a clear definition. This modification is one of the least highlighted changes in DSM–5. In this article we describe the history of the classification of borderline intellectual functioning. We provide information about it and on the importance of placing it in the right context and in the right place in future DSM editions and other classification systems such as the International Classification of Diseases.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Jannelien Wieland (j.wieland@centrumkristal.nl)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
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It is time to bring borderline intellectual functioning back into the main fold of classification systems

  • Jannelien Wieland (a1) and Frans G. Zitman (a2)
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