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Long-term antidepressant treatment in general practice: changes in body mass index

  • Laura Chiwanda (a1), Matthew Cordiner (a1), Anne T. Thompson (a1) and Polash Shajahan (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To discern changes in body mass index (BMI) in patients on long-term antidepressant treatment in a general practice population and establish BMI changes in patients with and without a diagnosis of diabetes. We used a retrospective observational method and identified patients on four antidepressants of interest. We excluded those who did not have start and current BMI readings within the past 3 years and noted whether or not patients had a diagnosis of diabetes.

Results

Long-term treatment with citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazapine and sertraline was associated with increased BMI in two-thirds of patients. There was reduction in BMI in patients with diabetes and an increase in BMI for patients who did not have diabetes.

Clinical implications

Awareness of environmental factors and their impact on individuals is important. Medication is not the only cause of abnormal metabolic effects. Overall monitoring of physical health is important in all groups of patients.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Polash Shajahan (polash.shajahan@lanarkshire.scot.nhs.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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4 Kivimäki, M, Jokela, M, Ebmeier, KP, Vahtera, J, Virtanen, M, Brunner, EJ, et al. Antidepressant medication use and risk of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus – a noncausal association? Biol Psychiatry 2011; 70: 978–84.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
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Long-term antidepressant treatment in general practice: changes in body mass index

  • Laura Chiwanda (a1), Matthew Cordiner (a1), Anne T. Thompson (a1) and Polash Shajahan (a1)
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