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Medicines reconciliation at the community mental health team–general practice interface: quality improvement study

  • Chris F. Johnson (a1), Karen Liddell (a1), Claudio Guerri (a1), Paul Findlay (a2) and Alex Thom (a1)...

Abstract

Aims and method

To increase the proportion of patients with no psychotropic drug discrepancies at the community mental health team (CMHT)–general practice interface. Three CMHTs participated. Over a 14 month period, quality improvement methodologies were used: individual patient-level feedback to patient's prescribers, run charts and meetings with CMHTs.

Results

One CMHT improved medicines reconciliation accuracy and demonstrated significant reductions in prescribing discrepancies. One in three (119/356) patients had ≥1 discrepancy involving 20% (166/847) of all prescribed psychotropics. Discrepancies were graded as: ‘fatal’ (0%), ‘serious’ (17%) and ‘negligible/minor harm’ (83%) but were associated with extra avoidable prescribing costs. For medicines routinely supplied by secondary care, 68% were not recorded in general practice electronic prescribing systems.

Clinical implications

Improvements in medicines reconciliation accuracy were achieved for one CMHT. This may have been partly owing to a multidisciplinary team approach to sharing and addressing prescribing discrepancies. Improving prescribing accuracy may help to reduce avoidable drug-related harms to patients.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Chris F. Johnson (c.johnson2@nhs.net)

References

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Medicines reconciliation at the community mental health team–general practice interface: quality improvement study

  • Chris F. Johnson (a1), Karen Liddell (a1), Claudio Guerri (a1), Paul Findlay (a2) and Alex Thom (a1)...
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