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Mental health problems, benefits and tackling discrimination

  • Alexander Galloway (a1), Billy Boland (a2) and Gareth Williams (a3)
Summary

Poverty is strongly associated with mental illness. Access to state benefits can be a lifeline for people with mental health problems in times of hardship and can assist them on their journey of recovery. However, benefit application processes can discriminate against those with mental illness and can result in individuals unjustly missing out on support. Clinical evidence from mental health professionals can ameliorate these challenges and ensure that people get access to financial help.

Declaration of interest

Dr Billy Boland is on the advisory board of the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Dr Alexander Galloway (alexander.galloway1@nhs.net)
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Mental health problems, benefits and tackling discrimination

  • Alexander Galloway (a1), Billy Boland (a2) and Gareth Williams (a3)
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