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The one and the many: a case highlighting comorbidity and complexity in psychiatry

  • Jonathan Williams (a1), Ruth Cain (a2), Danilo Arnone (a3) (a4) and Michalis Kyratsous (a4) (a5)

Abstract

Diagnostic categorisation is a typical stage of the medical model. Nevertheless, it is important to consider what is helpful to both the clinician and the patient when symptoms, experiences and perceptions are categorised. In this case report, we address the problem of comorbidity and complexity in psychiatry. Research and clinical experience point to significant overlap between personality disorders, mood disorders, and developmental disorders such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In the face of such complexity, we discuss ways of addressing and managing multiple diagnoses in clinical practice. We synthesise the perspectives and views of a general practice trainee, two consultant psychiatrists and a person with lived experience.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michalis Kyratsous (michalis.1.kyratsous@kcl.ac.uk)

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest: D.A. has received travel grants from Jansen-Cilag and Servier and sponsorship from Lundbeck.

Footnotes

References

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The one and the many: a case highlighting comorbidity and complexity in psychiatry

  • Jonathan Williams (a1), Ruth Cain (a2), Danilo Arnone (a3) (a4) and Michalis Kyratsous (a4) (a5)

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The one and the many: a case highlighting comorbidity and complexity in psychiatry

  • Jonathan Williams (a1), Ruth Cain (a2), Danilo Arnone (a3) (a4) and Michalis Kyratsous (a4) (a5)
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