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Patient characteristics and predictors of completion in residential treatment for substance use disorders

  • Giles Newton-Howes (a1) and James Stanley (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To identify the patient characteristics and rates of retention in a residential rehabilitation drug and alcohol service (Springhill) based on an eclectic model of care. Patients were assessed using the Alcohol and Drug Outcome Measure (ADOM), a brief tool designed for the New Zealand setting. We looked at correlations between demographic, social and drug use parameters. Logistic regression assessed the relative impact of each variable on completion.

Results

The 183 patients who completed the data collection did not differ from 47 non-completers by demographic data; 62.2% of patients completed the programme, with equal number of men and women. One in five participants was Maori, the indigenous minority. Alcohol (51.9%) was the commonest drug of misuse, with methamphetamine (16.4%) and cannabis (14.2%) also significant. Completers were more likely to be Maori, have conflict with family and housing problems, although the last became non-significant in logistic regression.

Clinical implications

Retention rates are higher in Springhill than in comparable programmes. Ethnicity and family conflict predict completion, although the reasons for this are unclear. ADOM is an effective tool that can be used in a clinical setting to enable analysis of service provision.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Giles Newton-Howes (giles.newton-howes@otago.ac.nz)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Patient characteristics and predictors of completion in residential treatment for substance use disorders

  • Giles Newton-Howes (a1) and James Stanley (a1)
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