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Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

  • Jonathan Radcliffe (a1) and Laura Bird (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants.

Results

Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors.

Clinical implications

Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Jonathan Radcliffe (jonathan.radcliffe@slam.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

  • Jonathan Radcliffe (a1) and Laura Bird (a2)
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