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Trainee experiences of intellectual disability psychiatry and an innovative leaderless support group: A qualitative study

  • Ross Spackman (a1), Hannah Toogood (a2), Jayne Kerridge (a2), Jon Nash (a3), Elizabeth Anderson (a4) and Dheeraj Rai (a5)...
Abstract
Aims and method

There is very little research into the challenges of training in intellectual disability psychiatry or into interventions which may address these challenges. Using focus groups, we explored the experiences of intellectual disability psychiatry trainees, and evaluated a leaderless trainee support group developed in Bristol.

Results

Five distinct themes were identified via framework analysis: that trainees felt unprepared for the difference from previous posts; the need for support; the value of the group; that trainees were concerned about judgement in supervision; that the group structure was valued.

Clinical implications

Our findings highlight the support needs specific to intellectual disability psychiatry trainees. Leaderless peer support groups may be a valued resource to address such issues, and may be a useful model to be considered by other training schemes.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Ross Spackman (ross.spackman@nhs.net)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
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Trainee experiences of intellectual disability psychiatry and an innovative leaderless support group: A qualitative study

  • Ross Spackman (a1), Hannah Toogood (a2), Jayne Kerridge (a2), Jon Nash (a3), Elizabeth Anderson (a4) and Dheeraj Rai (a5)...
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