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The transition from child and adolescent to adult mental health services with a focus on diagnosis progression

  • Ann Collins (a1) and Antonio Muñoz-Solomando (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

This article examines mental health disorders as individuals transition from adolescence to adulthood. Data were collected from clinical records of patients who had transitioned from child and adolescent mental health services to adult mental health services in a region in South Wales. Demographics and clinical diagnoses under both services were recorded. Patterns between adolescent and adult disorders as well as comorbidities were investigated using Pearson's χ2-test and Fisher's exact test.

Results

Of the 98 patients that transitioned from one service to the other, 74 had changes to their diagnoses. There were 164 total changes to diagnoses, with patients no longer meeting diagnostic criteria for 64 disorders and 100 new disorders being diagnosed. Comorbidity increased in adulthood.

Clinical implications

Diagnoses can evolve, particularly during adolescence and early adulthood. Therefore regular reassessment is paramount for successful treatment.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Dr Ann Collins (ann.collins@wales.nhs.uk)
References
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The transition from child and adolescent to adult mental health services with a focus on diagnosis progression

  • Ann Collins (a1) and Antonio Muñoz-Solomando (a1)
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