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Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents in a tier 4 psychiatric unit

  • Neil F. Stewart (a1) and Simon N. Lewis (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To review the current clinical practice and guidelines for testing and treating vitamin D deficiency in adolescents admitted to a tier 4 adolescent psychiatric unit in north London. The blood test results of 56 patients admitted between 2012 and 2014 were examined to determine whether vitamin D levels had been tested. For those individuals who were tested for vitamin D, results were analysed by gender and ethnicity.

Results

Of 56 patients admitted, 48% were tested for vitamin D deficiency and in 81.5% of cases we uncovered deficiency or severe deficiency; 18.5% had the minimum levels of vitamin D for bone health as per our trust guidelines.

Clinical implications

Adolescents within tier 4 adolescent mental health services may be at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency and so assessment of vitamin D levels should be considered as part of a standard physical health review for this group of young people.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Simon N. Lewis (slewis9@nhs.net)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents in a tier 4 psychiatric unit

  • Neil F. Stewart (a1) and Simon N. Lewis (a1)
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