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Associations between childhood maltreatment and inflammatory markers

  • Alish B. Palmos (a1), Stuart Watson (a2), Tom Hughes (a3), Andreas Finkelmeyer (a4), R. Hamish McAllister-Williams (a5), Nicol Ferrier (a6), Ian M. Anderson (a7), Rajesh Nair (a8), Allan H. Young (a9), Rebecca Strawbridge (a10), Anthony J. Cleare (a11), Raymond Chung (a12), Souci Frissa (a13), Laura Goodwin (a14), Matthew Hotopf (a15), Stephani L. Hatch (a16), Hong Wang (a17), David A. Collier (a18), Sandrine Thuret (a19), Gerome Breen (a20) and Timothy R. Powell (a21)...
Abstract
Background

Childhood maltreatment is one of the strongest predictors of adulthood depression and alterations to circulating levels of inflammatory markers is one putative mechanism mediating risk or resilience.

Aims

To determine the effects of childhood maltreatment on circulating levels of 41 inflammatory markers in healthy individuals and those with a major depressive disorder (MDD) diagnosis.

Method

We investigated the association of childhood maltreatment with levels of 41 inflammatory markers in two groups, 164 patients with MDD and 301 controls, using multiplex electrochemiluminescence methods applied to blood serum.

Results

Childhood maltreatment was not associated with altered inflammatory markers in either group after multiple testing correction. Body mass index (BMI) exerted strong effects on interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels in those with MDD.

Conclusions

Childhood maltreatment did not exert effects on inflammatory marker levels in either the participants with MDD or the control group in our study. Our results instead highlight the more pertinent influence of BMI.

Declaration of interest

D.A.C. and H.W. work for Eli Lilly Inc. R.N. has received speaker fees from Sunovion, Jansen and Lundbeck. G.B. has received consultancy fees and funding from Eli Lilly. R.H.M.-W. has received consultancy fees or has a financial relationship with AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cyberonics, Eli Lilly, Ferrer, Janssen-Cilag, Lundbeck, MyTomorrows, Otsuka, Pfizer, Pulse, Roche, Servier, SPIMACO and Sunovian. I.M.A. has received consultancy fees or has a financial relationship with Alkermes, Lundbeck, Lundbeck/Otsuka, and Servier. S.W. has sat on an advisory board for Sunovion, Allergan and has received speaker fees from Astra Zeneca. A.H.Y. has received honoraria for speaking from Astra Zeneca, Lundbeck, Eli Lilly, Sunovion; honoraria for consulting from Allergan, Livanova and Lundbeck, Sunovion, Janssen; and research grant support from Janssen. A.J.C. has received honoraria for speaking from Astra Zeneca, honoraria for consulting with Allergan, Livanova and Lundbeck and research grant support from Lundbeck.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Timothy R. Powell, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, PO80, 16 De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: timothy.1.powell@kcl.ac.uk
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Associations between childhood maltreatment and inflammatory markers

  • Alish B. Palmos (a1), Stuart Watson (a2), Tom Hughes (a3), Andreas Finkelmeyer (a4), R. Hamish McAllister-Williams (a5), Nicol Ferrier (a6), Ian M. Anderson (a7), Rajesh Nair (a8), Allan H. Young (a9), Rebecca Strawbridge (a10), Anthony J. Cleare (a11), Raymond Chung (a12), Souci Frissa (a13), Laura Goodwin (a14), Matthew Hotopf (a15), Stephani L. Hatch (a16), Hong Wang (a17), David A. Collier (a18), Sandrine Thuret (a19), Gerome Breen (a20) and Timothy R. Powell (a21)...
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