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Defining a mood stabiliser: novel framework for research and clinical practice

  • Gin S. Malhi (a1), Richard Porter (a2), Lauren Irwin (a3), Amber Hamilton (a3), Grace Morris (a3), Darryl Bassett (a4), Bernhard T. Baune (a5), Philip Boyce (a6), Malcolm J. Hopwood (a7), Roger Mulder (a2), Gordon Parker (a8), Zola Mannie (a3), Tim Outhred (a3), Pritha Das (a3) and Ajeet B. Singh (a9)...
Summary

The term ‘mood stabiliser’ is ill-defined and lacks clinical utility. We propose a framework to evaluate medications and effectively communicate their mood stabilising properties – their acute and prophylactic efficacy across the domains of mania and depression. The standardised framework provides a common definition to facilitate research and clinical practice.

Declaration of interest

The Treatment Algorithm Group (TAG) was supported logistically by Servier who provided financial assistance with travel and accommodation for those TAG members travelling interstate or overseas to attend the meeting in Sydney (held on 18 November 2017). None of the committee were paid to participate in this project and Servier have not had any input into the content, format or outputs from this project.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Gin S Malhi, Distinguished Professor, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. Email: gin.malhi@sydney.edu.au
References
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1Ketter, TA. Definition of the term “mood stabilizer”. Bipolar Disord 2018; 20: 74–5.
2Bauer, MS, Mitchner, L. What is a “mood stabilizer”? An evidence-based response. Am J Psychiatry 2004; 161: 318.
3Kato, T. The term will survive. Bipolar Disord 2018; 20: 277.
4Hayes, J, Prah, P, Nazareth, I, King, M, Walters, K, Petersen, I, et al. Prescribing trends in bipolar disorder: cohort study in the United Kingdom THIN primary care database 1995–2009. PloS One 2011; 6: e28725.
5Outhred, T, McAulay, C, Gessler, D, Malhi, GS. Monitoring for metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in bipolar disorder: a shared illness process approach. In Cardiovascular Diseases and Depression (eds Baune, BT and Tully, PJ): 333–50. Springer, 2016.
6Malhi, GS, Chengappa, K. Why ‘mood stabilizer' needs stability: polar views on its utility. Bipolar Disord 2017; 19: 414–6.
7.Frank, E, Prien, R, Jarrett, R, Keller, M, Kupfer, D, Lavori, P, et al. Conceptualization and rationale for consensus definitions of terms in major depressive disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1991; 48: 851–5.
8.Baune, BT, Malhi, GS. A review on the impact of cognitive dysfunction on social, occupational, and general functional outcomes in bipolar disorder. Bipolar Disord 2015; 17 (suppl 2): 4155.
9.Berk, M, Dodd, S, Malhi, GS. ‘Bipolar missed states’: the diagnosis and clinical salience of bipolar mixed states. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2005; 39: 215–21.
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BJPsych Open
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  • EISSN: 2056-4724
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Defining a mood stabiliser: novel framework for research and clinical practice

  • Gin S. Malhi (a1), Richard Porter (a2), Lauren Irwin (a3), Amber Hamilton (a3), Grace Morris (a3), Darryl Bassett (a4), Bernhard T. Baune (a5), Philip Boyce (a6), Malcolm J. Hopwood (a7), Roger Mulder (a2), Gordon Parker (a8), Zola Mannie (a3), Tim Outhred (a3), Pritha Das (a3) and Ajeet B. Singh (a9)...
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