Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-qj5tk Total loading time: 0.165 Render date: 2022-07-03T12:03:31.488Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Differences in Remote Mental Healthcare: Minority Ethnic Service User Experiences and Perceptions During COVID-19

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2022

Lamiya Samad
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
Bonnie Teague
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom University of East Anglia, East of England, United Kingdom
Karen Moreira
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom
Sophie Bagge
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom
Khalifa Elzubeir
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom
Emma Marriott
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom
Jonathan Wilson
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom University of East Anglia, East of England, United Kingdom
Nita Agarwal*
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, East of England, United Kingdom
*
*Presenting author.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Aims

COVID-19 has resurfaced health inequalities but also provides new opportunities for remote healthcare. Minority ethnic service users (SUs) are substantially under-represented in secondary mental health services due to gaps in understanding needs of this priority group. We aimed to assess and identify any differences in characteristics and acceptability, with a focus on minority ethnic mental health SUs.

Methods

A prospective, online feedback questionnaire was developed with the help of SUs. This was built into video consultations (VCs), using the secure Attend Anywhere platform through a survey link. We present results between July 2020 and January 2022, during which, a total of 2,565 SUs completed the online questionnaire after VCs. SPSS (version 27) was used for descriptive statistical analysis. Chi-squared test, using 5% level of significance, was conducted to test differences between the two (minority Vs majority ethnic) SU groups.

Results

Of 2,565 SUs, 119 (4.6%) were from minority ethnic groups (Asian British, Mixed/multiple, Black British, and Other), 2,398 (93.5%) were White British, and 48 (1.9%) preferred not to disclose. A higher percentage of SUs were females from both minority (55.6%) and White British (66.1%) ethnic groups (ϰ2=5.476, p < 0.05). By age group, almost half (48.7%) of minority ethnic SUs were less than 25 years old, compared with those from White British ethnicity (29.2%). In contrast, only 2.5% minority ethnic SUs were aged ≥65 years with none ≥80 years old (ϰ2 Likelihood Ratio = 27.11, p < 0.001).

No significant differences were found for video technical quality, such as waiting area, joining the video call, sound, and video quality. Similar findings were observed for video care delivery aspects with no significant differences between (minority ethnic and White British) SUs. Overall, both groups felt comfortable during the video call (ϰ2=0.137, p > 0.05), their needs were met (ϰ2=0.384, p > 0.05) and felt supported (ϰ2=0.164, p > 0.05). However, according to care team, a significantly higher percentage of minority ethnic SUs (43%) had remotely consulted Specialist (Eating disorders, Well-being/IAPT) services compared with those of majority ethnicity (29%) (ϰ2 Likelihood Ratio = 21.936, p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Both minority ethnic and White British SUs found video care to be acceptable, with positive experiences. A significantly high proportion of minority ethnic SUs was younger and had remotely consulted Specialist services, with none in the 80-plus age group. These findings highlight priority areas to address among this massively underrepresented group in mental healthcare services.

Type
Research
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Differences in Remote Mental Healthcare: Minority Ethnic Service User Experiences and Perceptions During COVID-19
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Differences in Remote Mental Healthcare: Minority Ethnic Service User Experiences and Perceptions During COVID-19
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Differences in Remote Mental Healthcare: Minority Ethnic Service User Experiences and Perceptions During COVID-19
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *