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Exploring the genetic correlations of antisocial behaviour and life history traits

  • Jorim J. Tielbeek (a1), J.C. Barnes (a2), Arne Popma (a3), Tinca J.C. Polderman (a4), James J. Lee (a5), John R.B. Perry (a6), Danielle Posthuma (a7) and Brian B. Boutwell (a8)...
Summary

Prior evolutionary theory provided reason to suspect that measures of development and reproduction would be correlated with antisocial behaviours in human and non-human species. Behavioural genetics has revealed that most quantitative traits are heritable, suggesting that these phenotypic correlations may share genetic aetiologies. We use genome-wide association study data to estimate the genetic correlations between various measures of reproductive development (N = 52 776–318 863) and antisocial behaviour (N = 31 968). Our genetic correlation analyses demonstrate that alleles associated with higher reproductive output (number of children ever born, rg = 0.50, P = 0.0065) were positively correlated with alleles associated with antisocial behaviour, whereas alleles associated with more delayed reproductive onset (age at first birth, rg = −0.64, P = 0.0008) were negatively associated with alleles linked to antisocial behaviour. Ultimately, these findings coalesce with evolutionary theories suggesting that increased antisocial behaviours may partly represent a faster life history approach, which may be significantly calibrated by genes.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Jorim J Tielbeek, Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Email: j.tielbeek@vumc.nl
References
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Exploring the genetic correlations of antisocial behaviour and life history traits

  • Jorim J. Tielbeek (a1), J.C. Barnes (a2), Arne Popma (a3), Tinca J.C. Polderman (a4), James J. Lee (a5), John R.B. Perry (a6), Danielle Posthuma (a7) and Brian B. Boutwell (a8)...
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